bookmark_borderNET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID When Moving SSL Certs Between Servers

Been doing a lot of spring cleaning lately and every now and then I stumble into walls that send me down rabbit holes. Sucks for me, but it’s great for you. I use this site to document the process for myself, and in the process share some tips for anyone that might need it.

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bookmark_borderHow to capture POST Requests on Webserver / Website

Sometimes you just want to see what someone is sending to your website. But how? Access logs by themselves can be pretty vanilla, you can see that a user made a POST request, but what exactly did they send?

Caution: This could include sensitive information like log in credentials, credit card information, and other sensitive data. Oh yeah, it will create massive log files that could create Disk I/O issues as well. Recommend doing this in a testing, troubleshooting, capacity only.

You can see what’s in the POST request by using the dumpio module for Apache

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bookmark_borderERROR 1064 (42000) at line 1 – Passing MySQL Create User Arguments via SSH

I was recently building a script to help move things from one server to another and in the process stumbled into a very annoying problem when passing MySQL arguments to a remote server via SSH.

Desired outcome: Create a new user in a remote DB using SSH.

In practice, this should be extremely simple. If you do this on the server, you could execute a command like this:

mysql --user="root" --password="[pass]" --execute="create user 'testing'@'localhost' identified by '123';"

You would now have a new user in your database called testing and it’s password would be 123.

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bookmark_borderCan’t Scroll in Windows Subsystem for Linux

I don’t know when it started, but at some point in 2021 I was not able to scroll inside my linux terminal on Windows. I really don’t care why it started, but I do know the fix.

After banging my head on a wall, and living with it for a few months, I decided enough was enough.

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bookmark_borderTroubleshooting PHP-FPM: ERROR: [pool [name1]] unable to set listen address as it’s already used in another pool ‘[name2]’

This error is telling you that you forgot to update your listening address. You likely have another pool configuration pointing to the same address.

For example, name1.conf is pointing to:

listen = 127.0.0.1:9000

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bookmark_borderSigning an App using a CodeSign certificate with SignTool & Windows 10

I was recently working with a new Windows app we built at CleanBrowsing and our users were getting hit with security warnings post-installation. This warning was generated because the app was not signed.

Ok, let’s get things signed.

To sign I would need a code-sign certificate. I went through the process of getting an Extended Validation (EV) certificate from GlobalSign.

Site Note: The process was not too bad, you sign some forms, take some pictures and you’re done. You do need a Windows machine when download the certificate, be prepared for that.

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bookmark_borderMigrating to a New User on Mastodon

Over the past year I have become a bigger proponent for platform like Mastodon. With such adoption, some things are not always as clear as you might expect them to be.

In this instance I wanted to change from one user to another. Example:

user1@noc.social to user2@noc.social

It is possible, but not as seamless as you might have come to expect from other experiences.

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bookmark_borderGoogle Authenticator App fails to load after iOS 14.2 Update

The recent iOS 14.2 update is a critical security update. If you haven’t done so already, you should really update.

If you do, be mindful that some apps might not load. For me, it was the Google Authenticator app. This was especially concerning because I use it for Two Factor Authentication (2FA) on a lot of systems.

The solution is simple, and all credit goes to Nick Lowe for sharing it:

It’s extremely straight forward. Once you offload it, you’ll see it immediately asks you to reinstall it. So don’t get too panicked.

One thing to be mindful of is iDevice Storage is generic and accounts for iPhone and iPAD. For me, on an iPhone it reads iPhone Storage:

What’s really nifty about this is it offloads the app without losing the data. Being this is my 2FA app, it’s critical I don’t lose it.

Apple does provide an instructional on what to do if an app doesn’t open after an update but doesn’t provide this as an option.

bookmark_borderLocked Out of Windows and Forgot Password

Made a bone head mistake this week. While testing on one of my machines I removed my user from the admin group, then changed the admin password. I also forgot to write down the admin password.

Yup, this means I now had a user configured that had no administrative privileges. Well, that sucks.

I was going to reimage the whole machine, but turns out there is an easier way if you are on Windows 10 and higher.

Enable Default Administrator Account

This is actually a pretty scary feature as it comes built into Windows 10 by default. You can enable the built-in Administrator account from the log in screen using the command prompt.

All you will need is a Windows Bootable USB, and you can create one easily following the instructions here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

When you first boot your Windows device you’ll notice the following utility Manager:

You want to switch it so that when you click on it, it opens the command prompt instead of the utility manager. To do this you have to switch the programs, and you can do this by repairing the system.

1 – Boot From a Bootable Windows USB / Disc

You can make this change in your BIOS settings.

When the bootable disc opens, you’ll be be presented with the Windows Setup page, click NEXT.

The next page is going to ask you to INSTALL, don’t.

The bottom left you will see an option that read “Repair your computer“, click on it.

You will be presented with a few options, select “Troubleshoot“.

Select the “Command Prompt” option.

Here we’re going to swap the utility manager with the command prompt program.

copy c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe c:\

This should respond with 1 file(s) copied.

copy c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe

This will respond with:

Overwrite c:\windows\system32\utilman.exe? (Yes/No/All):

Answer Yes.

Now Reboot the Machine.

2 – Enable Default Administrator

When your machine reboots, click on the same utility manager option on the screen. If done correctly, it should enable the command prompt:

Now type this:

net user administrator /active:yes

This will enable the default system administrator, which by design has no password. Assuming you’re not on an enterprise machine, you can bet that it is likely still enabled.

Reboot the machine.

3 – Log In as Administrator

When the machine reboots you will see a new user – Adminstrator – on the screen. Select that user and log in.

Assuming you have not disabled this user, it should work.

TIP: This is actually a very scary feature that can be easily misused by bad actors so I recommend removing this user, or creating a different one, that isn’t the default moving forward.